Prodotti

The Origins and Evolution of Grappa

The Origins and Evolution of Grappa

The origin of grappa is lost in the Middle Ages: around 1000 AD, a distillate that was the precursor to today’s Italian spirits was created as part of the studies of the Salernitana Medical School, which defined and codified the rules for concentrating alcohol through distillation and its use in the treatment of multiple human pathologies.
One thing is clear though: Grappa is the fruit of the ingenuity of a people – the Italians. From a by-product of the winemaking process – the pomace – it was they who managed to obtain a unique, wonderfully aromatic distillate, characterised by a great depth of aromas and clearly superior to the raw ingredient used in its making: wine.
During a time marked by hard physical labour, the ready availability of pomace led to the spread of the art of distilling – grappa making – in Italy, a trend which was particularly popular among the foothills and mountain areas of northern Italy. In these areas in centuries past, grappa was used as a remedy not only against the rigours of hard labour, but also to protect against the cold of the harsh winters.
The life and ways of working hinted at above are a far cry from our modern world. And it’s likely that grappa consumption today would be very different had there not been a general and consistent evolution in the making of this distillate.
Public perception of Grappa has also changed considerably: from humble distillate, grappa has risen to prominence, acquiring prestige and nobility, and in recent decades has garnered a reputation as an elite product capable of setting trends.
Credit for this transformation is undoubtedly due to the care and refinement that goes into the packaging and high-quality communication campaigns adopted by many producers. But none of this would have been possible without a profound change to the product itself: most – but sadly not all – producers have recognised the changes to consumer tastes and have focussed on creating modern grappas, characterised by less pungent aromas and fruitier, cleaner flavours.
This has resulted in increased appreciation of grappa not only nationally, but also globally, where this particular spirit has become a strong emblem of renowned Italian art and culture.